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Framing a House

Framing a House
by Roe Osborn
PDF Download
House framing can be an intimidating challenge. Thousands of pieces of wood must be cut to precise dimensions, according to a set of plans. Accurate and safe assembly is critical as the house must support the weight of building materials, equipment, appliances, and people -- there's simply no room for error. And yet, this comprehensive, accessible, and highly visual book walks readers through this complicated process with ease. It's all here -- from using the right tools and framing a first-floor deck; to building stairs, roofs, and dormers; and installing exterior trim. Former Fine Homebuilding editor and builder Roe Osborn doesn't leave out the hard parts; he simply makes them understandable.

About the Author
Although he has a degree in sculpture from Georgetown University, once out of college, Roe Osborn had to make a living. He soon found his way into construction, where he spent years as a professional builder, learning each aspect of the homebuilding trade. After 15 years with a hammer and tool belt, Roe joined the staff of Fine Homebuilding magazine in 1994, where as a senior editor he transformed complex construction subjects into approachable, understandable packages of concise text and clear photography. Today he makes a living as an architectural photographer on Cape Cod, where his network of construction contacts has allowed him to find just the right small house to use as the model for this book.
by Roe Osborn
Paperback
House framing can be an intimidating challenge. Thousands of pieces of wood must be cut to precise dimensions, according to a set of plans. Accurate and safe assembly is critical as the house must support the weight of building materials, equipment, appliances, and people -- there's simply no room for error. And yet, this comprehensive, accessible, and highly visual book walks readers through this complicated process with ease. It's all here -- from using the right tools and framing a first-floor deck; to building stairs, roofs, and dormers; and installing exterior trim. Former Fine Homebuilding editor and builder Roe Osborn doesn't leave out the hard parts; he simply makes them understandable.

About the Author
Although he has a degree in sculpture from Georgetown University, once out of college, Roe Osborn had to make a living. He soon found his way into construction, where he spent years as a professional builder, learning each aspect of the homebuilding trade. After 15 years with a hammer and tool belt, Roe joined the staff of Fine Homebuilding magazine in 1994, where as a senior editor he transformed complex construction subjects into approachable, understandable packages of concise text and clear photography. Today he makes a living as an architectural photographer on Cape Cod, where his network of construction contacts has allowed him to find just the right small house to use as the model for this book.
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Details

Details

House framing can be an intimidating challenge. Thousands of pieces of wood must be cut to precise dimensions, according to a set of plans. Accurate and safe assembly is critical as the house must support the weight of building materials, equipment, appliances, and people -- there's simply no room for error. And yet, this comprehensive, accessible, and highly visual book walks readers through this complicated process with ease. It's all here -- from using the right tools and framing a first-floor deck; to building stairs, roofs, and dormers; and installing exterior trim. Former Fine Homebuilding editor and builder Roe Osborn doesn't leave out the hard parts; he simply makes them understandable.

About the Author
Although he has a degree in sculpture from Georgetown University, once out of college, Roe Osborn had to make a living. He soon found his way into construction, where he spent years as a professional builder, learning each aspect of the homebuilding trade. After 15 years with a hammer and tool belt, Roe joined the staff of Fine Homebuilding magazine in 1994, where as a senior editor he transformed complex construction subjects into approachable, understandable packages of concise text and clear photography. Today he makes a living as an architectural photographer on Cape Cod, where his network of construction contacts has allowed him to find just the right small house to use as the model for this book.

Details

House framing can be an intimidating challenge. Thousands of pieces of wood must be cut to precise dimensions, according to a set of plans. Accurate and safe assembly is critical as the house must support the weight of building materials, equipment, appliances, and people -- there's simply no room for error. And yet, this comprehensive, accessible, and highly visual book walks readers through this complicated process with ease. It's all here -- from using the right tools and framing a first-floor deck; to building stairs, roofs, and dormers; and installing exterior trim. Former Fine Homebuilding editor and builder Roe Osborn doesn't leave out the hard parts; he simply makes them understandable.

About the Author
Although he has a degree in sculpture from Georgetown University, once out of college, Roe Osborn had to make a living. He soon found his way into construction, where he spent years as a professional builder, learning each aspect of the homebuilding trade. After 15 years with a hammer and tool belt, Roe joined the staff of Fine Homebuilding magazine in 1994, where as a senior editor he transformed complex construction subjects into approachable, understandable packages of concise text and clear photography. Today he makes a living as an architectural photographer on Cape Cod, where his network of construction contacts has allowed him to find just the right small house to use as the model for this book.
Additional Information

Additional Information

SKU FHB62077853
Table Of Contents Introduction

Chapter 1: Before You Pick Up That Hammer
Evolution of the House Frame
The Building Code: Framing Ground Rules
The Importance of Uniform Spacing
Before the Frame
Components of a House Frame
Frame Engineering
Framing Materials

Chapter 2: Basic Framing Tools and Tool Techniques
Measuring and Layout
Hammers (the Original Cordless Nailer)
Other Essential Hand Tools
Choosing and Adjusting a Circular Saw
Basic Saw Techniques
Nailing
Tolerances: How Close Is Close Enough?

Chapter 3: Framing the First-Floor Deck
Mudsills
Support Beams
Floor Joists
Floor Sheathing
Installing Lally columns

Chapter 4: Exterior Walls
Layout and Preparation for the First Walls
Preassemble the Walls
Assemble the Walls
Sheathe the Walls
Raise, Plumb, and Brace the Walls

Chapter 5: Framing the Second-Floor Deck
Prep Work for the Second Floor
Setting the LVL Beams
Joist Installation
Second-Floor Sheathing

Chapter 6: Building Stairs
Calculating Stairs
Cutting the Stair Stringers
Installing the Stairs

Chapter 7: Framing Gable Walls
Installing the Main Gable Wall Plates
Measure and Cut the Gable Rafters
Build and Raise the Gables
Framing the Dormer Gables
Cheek Walls

Chapter 8: Ridges, Rafters, and Roof Sheathing
Installing the Main Roof Rafters and Ridge
Installing Roof Sheathing
Framing Dormer Roofs

Chapter 9: Framing Interior Walls and Ceilings
Prep Work for the Framing
First-Floor Walls
Second-Floor Walls

Chapter 10: Exterior Trim and the Front Porch
Installing Exterior Trim
Framing the Porch

Afterword

Index
Intro I had a good friend who graduated near the top of his class in high school but never bothered with college. All he ever wanted to do was build houses. As soon as he was old enough to swing a hammer for a living, he joined a framing crew. He quickly worked his way through the ranks, absorbing everything he could until he was the foreman. Then he quit. He joined another crew, started at the bottom and again worked his way up to foreman, soaking up all the knowledge of the crew. He quit and repeated the cycle a half-dozen times before finally forming his own company. At that point he'd seen the methods and mistakes of dozens of craftsmen and had learned the fastest and most effective way to build a house. If you're aspiring to become a professional builder, I'd highly recommend that path.

For me, working as an editor at Fine Homebuilding magazine was akin to that process. I tried to tackle every article like it was my first day on the job. My mission was to soak up the knowledge of the incredibly talented authors it was my pleasure to work with. Sure, I'd done my share of framing in my hammer-swinging days, but I probably learned more behind a camera and in front of a keyboard than I ever did on all the jobsites I worked as a carpenter. What I've tried to present in this book is the culmination of that knowledge. I focused on a particular house and a particular crew, and these guys still taught me new things, just as with every other crew.

If you're reading this book, you probably have a gnawing curiosity about how houses are built, with an equally strong desire to gain the knowledge and develop the skills to build your own house at some point. I've lived in half a dozen houses, and in every one I found myself daydreaming about how the house went together and what the jobsite was like when each house was being built. So I hope this book fuels your curiosity and fires your courage to build your own house. If you do, I can promise that you'll never have a greater sense of pride than knowing that you built the roof over your head. And if working with your hands and building things makes your heart pound with excitement, then building your own house will be an amazingly fun and enjoyable time.

That said, I offer these words of caution.
  • Always think through a process before jumping in.
  • If there's something you don't understand, find a craftsman who will take the time to explain a process or a procedure. There are many skilled builders who are willing to share their knowledge with people willing to learn.
  • If a process doesn't seem safe to you, then it probably isn't. Find a way to do every task safely.
  • Always do your prep work before performing a task. That may mean building safe scaffolding, or setting up a work table, or re-routing hoses and extension cords. Whatever the task, proper preparation will make the job go more smoothly and more safely.
  • Wear safety equipment! Professionals are notorious for not using proper protection, sometimes out of ignorance and sometimes from a false sense of pride. Don't fall prey to the same weaknesses.

Good luck and build safe!

Roe Osborn
Video No
Author Roe Osborn
ISBN 978-1-60085-474-3
Publication Year 2010
Pages No
Photo No
Drawings No
Video Download No
Other Formats 71253
Cover PDF Download
Format eBook (PDF)

Additional Information

SKU FHB72071253
Table Of Contents Introduction

Chapter 1: Before You Pick Up That Hammer
Evolution of the House Frame
The Building Code: Framing Ground Rules
The Importance of Uniform Spacing
Before the Frame
Components of a House Frame
Frame Engineering
Framing Materials

Chapter 2: Basic Framing Tools and Tool Techniques
Measuring and Layout
Hammers (the Original Cordless Nailer)
Other Essential Hand Tools
Choosing and Adjusting a Circular Saw
Basic Saw Techniques
Nailing
Tolerances: How Close Is Close Enough?

Chapter 3: Framing the First-Floor Deck
Mudsills
Support Beams
Floor Joists
Floor Sheathing
Installing Lally columns

Chapter 4: Exterior Walls
Layout and Preparation for the First Walls
Preassemble the Walls
Assemble the Walls
Sheathe the Walls
Raise, Plumb, and Brace the Walls

Chapter 5: Framing the Second-Floor Deck
Prep Work for the Second Floor
Setting the LVL Beams
Joist Installation
Second-Floor Sheathing

Chapter 6: Building Stairs
Calculating Stairs
Cutting the Stair Stringers
Installing the Stairs

Chapter 7: Framing Gable Walls
Installing the Main Gable Wall Plates
Measure and Cut the Gable Rafters
Build and Raise the Gables
Framing the Dormer Gables
Cheek Walls

Chapter 8: Ridges, Rafters, and Roof Sheathing
Installing the Main Roof Rafters and Ridge
Installing Roof Sheathing
Framing Dormer Roofs

Chapter 9: Framing Interior Walls and Ceilings
Prep Work for the Framing
First-Floor Walls
Second-Floor Walls

Chapter 10: Exterior Trim and the Front Porch
Installing Exterior Trim
Framing the Porch

Afterword

Index
Intro I had a good friend who graduated near the top of his class in high school but never bothered with college. All he ever wanted to do was build houses. As soon as he was old enough to swing a hammer for a living, he joined a framing crew. He quickly worked his way through the ranks, absorbing everything he could until he was the foreman. Then he quit. He joined another crew, started at the bottom and again worked his way up to foreman, soaking up all the knowledge of the crew. He quit and repeated the cycle a half-dozen times before finally forming his own company. At that point he'd seen the methods and mistakes of dozens of craftsmen and had learned the fastest and most effective way to build a house. If you're aspiring to become a professional builder, I'd highly recommend that path.

For me, working as an editor at Fine Homebuilding magazine was akin to that process. I tried to tackle every article like it was my first day on the job. My mission was to soak up the knowledge of the incredibly talented authors it was my pleasure to work with. Sure, I'd done my share of framing in my hammer-swinging days, but I probably learned more behind a camera and in front of a keyboard than I ever did on all the jobsites I worked as a carpenter. What I've tried to present in this book is the culmination of that knowledge. I focused on a particular house and a particular crew, and these guys still taught me new things, just as with every other crew.

If you're reading this book, you probably have a gnawing curiosity about how houses are built, with an equally strong desire to gain the knowledge and develop the skills to build your own house at some point. I've lived in half a dozen houses, and in every one I found myself daydreaming about how the house went together and what the jobsite was like when each house was being built. So I hope this book fuels your curiosity and fires your courage to build your own house. If you do, I can promise that you'll never have a greater sense of pride than knowing that you built the roof over your head. And if working with your hands and building things makes your heart pound with excitement, then building your own house will be an amazingly fun and enjoyable time.

That said, I offer these words of caution.
  • Always think through a process before jumping in.
  • If there's something you don't understand, find a craftsman who will take the time to explain a process or a procedure. There are many skilled builders who are willing to share their knowledge with people willing to learn.
  • If a process doesn't seem safe to you, then it probably isn't. Find a way to do every task safely.
  • Always do your prep work before performing a task. That may mean building safe scaffolding, or setting up a work table, or re-routing hoses and extension cords. Whatever the task, proper preparation will make the job go more smoothly and more safely.
  • Wear safety equipment! Professionals are notorious for not using proper protection, sometimes out of ignorance and sometimes from a false sense of pride. Don't fall prey to the same weaknesses.

Good luck and build safe!

Roe Osborn
ISBN 978-1-60085-101-8
Video No
Author Roe Osborn
Publication Year 2010
Dimensions 9 3/16 x 10 7/8
Pages 240
Photo 429 full-color photographs
Drawings and 36 drawings
Other Formats 77853
Cover Paperback
Format Paperback
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