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The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation

The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation
by Charlie Wing
Paperback

The gold-standard reference for energy conservation. For homeowners, builders, remodelers, architects anyone with a commitment to reducing energy use, The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation fills the bill and lowers it too! It's the most comprehensive guide to reducing home energy around and the easiest to use.

Well-organized data and 800 illustrations. The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation covers every facet of home energy conservation drawing from expert sources: manufacturers, the most current energy-related building codes, and LEED green-building and builder association information. It begins by defining BTUs and types of fuel, covers heating, cooling, hot water, and insulation, details best practices, and winds up with an overview of solar strategies.

A resource for pros and non-pros.Written and illustrated to inform the layperson and the professional, this must-have guide details both low-tech and high-tech ways to cut energy use and create a more efficient home, including:

  • 5 rules for cooking efficiently and 16 ways homeowners can save hot water
  • The latest on building codes, thermal envelopes, and solar electric systems
  • Simple explanations, comparisons, and diagrams for non-pros
  • In-depth technical data, formulae, and worksheets for professionals

Invest in information that really pays off. Paging through The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation, you'll be amazed at how many ways there are to save, big and small. Just changing a shower head or choosing the best R-value windows can add up to huge savings over time, never mind what happens when you tackle the moisture in the basement. Get your copy now and keep your dollars from going down the drain!

Order your copy now.

by Charlie Wing
PDF Download

The gold-standard reference for energy conservation. For homeowners, builders, remodelers, architects – anyone with a commitment to reducing energy use, The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation fills the bill – and lowers it too! It’s the most comprehensive guide to reducing home energy around and the easiest to use.

Well-organized data and 800 illustrations. The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation covers every facet of home energy conservation drawing from expert sources: manufacturers, the most current energy-related building codes, and LEED green-building and builder association information. It begins by defining BTUs and types of fuel, covers heating, cooling, hot water, and insulation, details best practices, and winds up with an overview of solar strategies.

A resource for pros and non-pros. Written and illustrated to inform the layperson and the professional, this must-have guide details both low-tech and high-tech ways to cut energy use and create a more efficient home, including:

  • 5 rules for cooking efficiently and 16 ways homeowners can save hot water
  • The latest on building codes, thermal envelopes, and solar electric systems
  • Simple explanations, comparisons, and diagrams for non-pros
  • In-depth technical data, formulae, and worksheets for professionals

Invest in information that really pays off. Paging through The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation, you’ll be amazed at how many ways there are to save, big and small. Just changing a shower head or choosing the best R-value windows can add up to huge savings over time, never mind what happens when you tackle the moisture in the basement. Get your copy now and keep your dollars from going down the drain!

Download your copy now.

Paperback

List Price: $29.95

Today's Price: $23.96

( Availability: In Stock )
eBook (PDF)

List Price: $29.95

Today's Price: $21.56

( Availability: In Stock )
Availability: In Stock

List Price: $29.95

Today's Price: $23.96

Availability: In Stock

List Price: $29.95

Today's Price: $21.56

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Details

Details

The gold-standard reference for energy conservation. For homeowners, builders, remodelers, architects anyone with a commitment to reducing energy use, The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation fills the bill and lowers it too! It's the most comprehensive guide to reducing home energy around and the easiest to use.

Well-organized data and 800 illustrations. The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation covers every facet of home energy conservation drawing from expert sources: manufacturers, the most current energy-related building codes, and LEED green-building and builder association information. It begins by defining BTUs and types of fuel, covers heating, cooling, hot water, and insulation, details best practices, and winds up with an overview of solar strategies.

A resource for pros and non-pros.Written and illustrated to inform the layperson and the professional, this must-have guide details both low-tech and high-tech ways to cut energy use and create a more efficient home, including:

  • 5 rules for cooking efficiently and 16 ways homeowners can save hot water
  • The latest on building codes, thermal envelopes, and solar electric systems
  • Simple explanations, comparisons, and diagrams for non-pros
  • In-depth technical data, formulae, and worksheets for professionals

Invest in information that really pays off. Paging through The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation, you'll be amazed at how many ways there are to save, big and small. Just changing a shower head or choosing the best R-value windows can add up to huge savings over time, never mind what happens when you tackle the moisture in the basement. Get your copy now and keep your dollars from going down the drain!

Order your copy now.

Details

The gold-standard reference for energy conservation. For homeowners, builders, remodelers, architects – anyone with a commitment to reducing energy use, The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation fills the bill – and lowers it too! It’s the most comprehensive guide to reducing home energy around and the easiest to use.

Well-organized data and 800 illustrations. The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation covers every facet of home energy conservation drawing from expert sources: manufacturers, the most current energy-related building codes, and LEED green-building and builder association information. It begins by defining BTUs and types of fuel, covers heating, cooling, hot water, and insulation, details best practices, and winds up with an overview of solar strategies.

A resource for pros and non-pros. Written and illustrated to inform the layperson and the professional, this must-have guide details both low-tech and high-tech ways to cut energy use and create a more efficient home, including:

  • 5 rules for cooking efficiently and 16 ways homeowners can save hot water
  • The latest on building codes, thermal envelopes, and solar electric systems
  • Simple explanations, comparisons, and diagrams for non-pros
  • In-depth technical data, formulae, and worksheets for professionals

Invest in information that really pays off. Paging through The Visual Handbook of Energy Conservation, you’ll be amazed at how many ways there are to save, big and small. Just changing a shower head or choosing the best R-value windows can add up to huge savings over time, never mind what happens when you tackle the moisture in the basement. Get your copy now and keep your dollars from going down the drain!

Download your copy now.

Additional Information

Additional Information

Table Of Contents

About Energy
The Three Faces of Energy _—¢ Temperature _—¢ Specific and Latent Heats _—¢ Heat Transfer _—¢ Unit Conversions _—¢ How Big Is a Btu?

Energy Fuels
Fuel Prices _—¢ Heating Equipment Efficiencies _—¢ Energy Content of Fuels _—¢ Calculating Cost per MBtu _—¢ Graphical Cost per MBtu

Climate
Heating Degree Days _—¢ Cooling Degree Days _—¢ Average and Design Temperatures _—¢ Relative Humidities _—¢ Precipitation _—¢ Solar Radiation Received on Windows _—¢ Radiation on South-Facing Surfaces _—¢ First and Last Frost Dates _—¢ Trees for Shade and Shelter _—¢ Shelterbelt Design _—¢ Microclimates

Heating
Building Heat Loads _—¢ Thermostats and Setback Savings _—¢ Gas Furnaces _—¢ Gas Boilers _—¢ Oil Furnaces _—¢ Oil Boilers _—¢ Air-Source Heat Pumps _—¢ Ground-Source Heat Pumps _—¢ Gas Stoves _—¢ Wood Stoves _—¢ Pellet Stoves _—¢ Warm Air Distribution _—¢ Hydronic Distribution _—¢ Radiant Heating _—¢ Free Convection

Cooling
Comfort _—¢ Capturing Natural Breezes _—¢ Using the Stack Effect _—¢ Utilizing a Building_—Ès Thermal Mass _—¢ Creating a Breeze with a Box Fan _—¢ Cooling with a Ceiling Fan _—¢ Evaporative Cooling _—¢ Air-Conditioning _—¢ Clock Thermostat Savings

Hot Water
Using Less Hot Water _—¢ Gas Storage Water Heater _—¢ Electric Storage Water Heater _—¢ Gas Tankless Water Heater _—¢ Electric Tankless Water Heater _—¢ BoilerMate Indirect Water Heater _—¢ Solar Water Heater _—¢ Lowering the Water Heater Thermostat _—¢ Low-Flow Showerheads and Aerators _—¢ Drainwater Heat Recovery _—¢ Pipe Insulation _—¢ Heat Traps _—¢ Cooking with Less Energy

Insulation and R-Value
Heat Transfer and R-Value _—¢ R-Values of Insulation Products _—¢ R-Values of Surfaces and Air Spaces _—¢ R-Values of Building Materials _—¢ Calculating Effective R-Values _—¢ Effective R-Values of Typical Constructions

Recommended R-Values
Where to Insulate: The Thermal Envelope _—¢ Determination of Recommended R-Values _—¢ Recommended R-Values for New Construction _—¢ IECC R-Values for New Construction _—¢ Recommended R-Values for Existing Houses

Best Insulating Practices
Insulating Attics and Cathedral Ceilings _—¢ Insulating Walls _—¢ Insulating Slab Foundations _—¢ Insulating Crawl Spaces _—¢ Insulating Full Basements _—¢ Retrofitting Full Basements

Windows and Exterior Doors
Windows with Clear Glazings _—¢ Thermal Conductance (U) _—¢ Visible Transmittance (VT) _—¢ Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) _—¢ Window Energy Performance Labels _—¢ Low-E Windows _—¢ Matching Low-E Windows to Climate _—¢ Improving Existing Windows _—¢ Weatherstripping Windows _—¢ Adding Glazings _—¢ Measuring for Window Insert Panels _—¢ Shrink-Wrapped Insert Panels _—¢ Screen-Splined Insert Panels _—¢ Exterior Doors _—¢ Weatherstripping Exterior Doors

Air Sealing the Envelope
A Field Guide to Air Leaks _—¢ Professional Leak Detection _—¢ Low-Tech Homeowner Leak Detection _—¢ Sealing Attic Air Leaks _—¢ Sealing Basement Air Leaks _—¢ Sealing Interior Air Leaks _—¢ Sealing Exterior Air Leaks

Moisture and Air Quality
Moisture and Air Quality _—¢ Optimum Humidity for Health _—¢ Signs of Excess Moisture _—¢ Moisture Sources in the Home _—¢ Capping the Big One: Basement Moisture _—¢ Behavior of Water Vapor in Air _—¢ Moisture Transport by Air Pressure _—¢ Moisture Transport by Diffusion _—¢ Preventing Building Cavity Condensation _—¢ Ventilation

Lighting
Edison_—Ès Incandescent Lamp _—¢ Halogen Incandescent Lamps _—¢ Compact Fluorescent Lamps _—¢ Light-Emitting Diode Lamps _—¢ Lamp Efficacy and Expected Life _—¢ Lighting Life-Cycle Costs _—¢ Motion Detection Switches _—¢ Replacement Priorities

Appliance Efficiency
Room Air Conditioners _—¢ Dishwashers _—¢ Clothes Washers, Old and New _—¢ Refrigerators _—¢ Reading Appliance Energy Guides _—¢ Measuring Appliance Electrical Usage _—¢ Reducing Phantom Electrical Loads

Solar Tempering
Solar Possibilities _—¢ Determining Solar Access and Shading _—¢ Sun Path Charts _—¢ Glazing Orientation and Tilt _—¢ Shading the Summer Sun _—¢ Storing Excess Solar Gain _—¢ A Design Procedure for Solar Tempering _—¢ Thermal Mass Patterns

Appendices

Units and Conversion Factors

Glossary

Additional Resources

Index

Intro No
ISBN 978-1-62113-956-0
Video No
Author Charlie Wing
Publication Year 2013
Dimensions 8 1/8 x 10 7/8
Pages 384
Photo 0
Drawings 800
Other Formats 77643
Cover Paperback
Format Paperback

Additional Information

Table Of Contents

About Energy
The Three Faces of Energy • Temperature • Specific and Latent Heats • Heat Transfer • Unit Conversions • How Big Is a Btu?

Energy Fuels
Fuel Prices • Heating Equipment Efficiencies • Energy Content of Fuels • Calculating Cost per MBtu • Graphical Cost per MBtu

Climate
Heating Degree Days • Cooling Degree Days • Average and Design Temperatures • Relative Humidities • Precipitation • Solar Radiation Received on Windows • Radiation on South-Facing Surfaces • First and Last Frost Dates • Trees for Shade and Shelter • Shelterbelt Design • Microclimates

Heating
Building Heat Loads • Thermostats and Setback Savings • Gas Furnaces • Gas Boilers • Oil Furnaces • Oil Boilers • Air-Source Heat Pumps • Ground-Source Heat Pumps • Gas Stoves • Wood Stoves • Pellet Stoves • Warm Air Distribution • Hydronic Distribution • Radiant Heating • Free Convection

Cooling
Comfort • Capturing Natural Breezes • Using the Stack Effect • Utilizing a Building’s Thermal Mass • Creating a Breeze with a Box Fan • Cooling with a Ceiling Fan • Evaporative Cooling • Air-Conditioning • Clock Thermostat Savings

Hot Water
Using Less Hot Water • Gas Storage Water Heater • Electric Storage Water Heater • Gas Tankless Water Heater • Electric Tankless Water Heater • BoilerMate Indirect Water Heater • Solar Water Heater • Lowering the Water Heater Thermostat • Low-Flow Showerheads and Aerators • Drainwater Heat Recovery • Pipe Insulation • Heat Traps • Cooking with Less Energy

Insulation and R-Value
Heat Transfer and R-Value • R-Values of Insulation Products • R-Values of Surfaces and Air Spaces • R-Values of Building Materials • Calculating Effective R-Values • Effective R-Values of Typical Constructions

Recommended R-Values
Where to Insulate: The Thermal Envelope • Determination of Recommended R-Values • Recommended R-Values for New Construction • IECC R-Values for New Construction • Recommended R-Values for Existing Houses

Best Insulating Practices
Insulating Attics and Cathedral Ceilings • Insulating Walls • Insulating Slab Foundations • Insulating Crawl Spaces • Insulating Full Basements • Retrofitting Full Basements

Windows and Exterior Doors
Windows with Clear Glazings • Thermal Conductance (U) • Visible Transmittance (VT) • Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) • Window Energy Performance Labels • Low-E Windows • Matching Low-E Windows to Climate • Improving Existing Windows • Weatherstripping Windows • Adding Glazings • Measuring for Window Insert Panels • Shrink-Wrapped Insert Panels • Screen-Splined Insert Panels • Exterior Doors • Weatherstripping Exterior Doors

Air Sealing the Envelope
A Field Guide to Air Leaks • Professional Leak Detection • Low-Tech Homeowner Leak Detection • Sealing Attic Air Leaks • Sealing Basement Air Leaks • Sealing Interior Air Leaks • Sealing Exterior Air Leaks

Moisture and Air Quality
Moisture and Air Quality • Optimum Humidity for Health • Signs of Excess Moisture • Moisture Sources in the Home • Capping the Big One: Basement Moisture • Behavior of Water Vapor in Air • Moisture Transport by Air Pressure • Moisture Transport by Diffusion • Preventing Building Cavity Condensation • Ventilation

Lighting
Edison’s Incandescent Lamp • Halogen Incandescent Lamps • Compact Fluorescent Lamps • Light-Emitting Diode Lamps • Lamp Efficacy and Expected Life • Lighting Life-Cycle Costs • Motion Detection Switches • Replacement Priorities

Appliance Efficiency
Room Air Conditioners • Dishwashers • Clothes Washers, Old and New • Refrigerators • Reading Appliance Energy Guides • Measuring Appliance Electrical Usage • Reducing Phantom Electrical Loads

Solar Tempering
Solar Possibilities • Determining Solar Access and Shading • Sun Path Charts • Glazing Orientation and Tilt • Shading the Summer Sun • Storing Excess Solar Gain • A Design Procedure for Solar Tempering • Thermal Mass Patterns

Appendices

Units and Conversion Factors

Glossary

Additional Resources

Index

Intro No
Video No
Author Charlie Wing
ISBN 978-1-62710-339-8
Publication Year 2013
Pages 384
Photo No
Drawings 800
Video Download No
Other Formats 71433
Cover PDF Download
Format eBook (PDF)
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